LIVERPOOL BURIAL GROUNDS

 

As in most large town and cities Liverpool has a larger population of the dead than the living. Graveyards and cemeteries are scattered across the city and its hinterland. Many of these are no longer in use and have been entirely cleared of graves and/or converted in green spaces or, perhaps, car parks or city farms. Even in the large corporation cemeteries that do still exist the apparently 'empty' sections actually house the vast majority of the interments. Click on the headings below to see maps of these lost and hidden burial places. 
Until 1361 the only place the inhabitants of Liverpool could bury their dead was in St Mary's Parish Church some miles away in Walton. In that year the town was granted permission to open its own burial ground, next to the chapel of St Nicholas. Until 1704 this was the only church, and therefore the only place of burial, within the town.
   
  • A TOXTETH PARK  
1856
  • B ANFIELD
1863
  • C EVERTON            
1880
  • D KIRKDALE           
1881
  • E WEST DERBY      
1884
  • F ALLERTON           
1909
  • G BOOTLE               
1913 

 

   
  • A ST JAMES'                    
1829
  • B NECROPOLIS               
1825
  • C ST MARY, KIRKDALE    
1837
   
  • HEBREW CONGREGATION CEMETERIES

 

   
  • A ST JOHN,        ST JOHN'S LANE  
1767+
  • B ST MARY, CAMBRIDGE ST  
1806-1849
  • C ST MARTIN, SILVESTER ST
1829-1861
  • D WALTON CEMETERY  
1856-1948

 

GRAVEYARDS

hS
 
  • NON-CONFORMIST
  • JEWISH

 

   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   

 

 

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